Admissions

Applications are made through the Clinical Child Psychology Program. All completed applicant files are reviewed and incoming students selected by a committee consisting of program faculty and a student representative and headed by the Clinical Child Psychology Training Director. The essential requirements for admission are a bachelor's degree from an accredited institution and a record of achievement that shows a strong promise of success in the program's course work and activities in research and clinical work. Applicants should have at least 15 hours of credit in psychology, including statistics and research methodology. The application process is highly competitive. All application materials must be received by December 1st.

Highly rated applicants will have some forms of relative experience appropriate to their level in psychological research and applied interactions with children. Admissions criteria include transcripts and grade-point averages from previous educational institutions, scores on the Graduate Record Examination (Verbal, Quantitative, Analytical, and, for students who did not major in psychology, the Advanced Test in Psychology), a personal statement describing your special interest in psychology, your professional goals, and why KU CCPP is appropriate for your doctoral training with an indication of interest in one or more faculty member's research team (individual faculty do not make admission decisions; the faculty reach consensus on admissions), and three letters of recommendation. Financial aid is available. Click on Student Data for a summary of admission statistics from previous years. Click here for information on what all applicants need to know.

The University of Kansas is committed to providing programs and activities to all persons, regardless of race, religion, color, sex, disability, national origin, ancestry, sexual orientation, marital or parental status, age, or veteran status. The program participates in an affirmative action program to encourage minority student application, admission, and successful completion of the program. Contact the program director for more information.

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The University of Kansas no longer accepts paper applications.

The final deadline is December 1st for All Applications to the CCPP.

 

Background Checks

The Program complies with the Kansas Board of Regents policy in which the University of Kansas conducts background checks for felony convictions to facilitate employment decisions that are in the best interest of university students, employees, resources and overall mission statement. These include Graduate Teaching Assistants, Graduate Research Assistants, and other employment situations in which graduate students are placed.  Applicants to the KU Clinical Child Psychology may be asked to provide details on any criminal convictions on their records. 

 

 


Clinical Child Psychology Events
KU Clinical Child Psychology Program in the news: http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2015/mar/11/multiple-ku-graduate-programs-make-top-10-newly-re/. Thanks to our outstanding students, alumni, faculty, staff, and affiliated partners for helping us make a difference in the field.
KU graduate programs ranked in top 10 by U.S. News and World Report
Ten Kansas University graduate specialties or schools are in the top 10 of public universities nationwide, according to U.S. News and World Report 2016 Best Graduate Schools Rankings released this week.

Turning rural America healthy: Christie Befort uses $10 million award. http://t.co/rrFjFtHbYT #KUcommunities http://t.co/Bsuek4k9QC
Lauded race and class historian becomes KU Foundation Professor David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he leads KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, is important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.”


One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
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